Archaeology


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This is a list of items that have been discovered in & around Witton Gilbert over the years, items are being discovered all the time so please check back from time to time. I would like to get some photos of these if possable and put them on here as they would make it more interesting for you to look at, but all in good time. We would like any information from any one that has discovered items, coins, buckles, any thing you can take a photo of.

Special Thanks to the following as this list of artifacts would not be here with out their co-operation.

John Geddes
Ken Wright

To enlarge just click on a photo


Please bear with us, as some of the photos take a while to down load.

Front of the Groat
Back of the Groat
Front
Back


Quatro Foil Penden
Crispus coin front
Front
Back


Front
Back
bangal
Bangle

bangal
bangal
bangal
pending
A fragment of a Type 2 Kilbride-Jones glass bangle. Translucent green glass with blue and white cord moulding at the apex. In section the bangle is sub-triangular. The cord moulding has not been significantly filed down and stands out slightly in relief. Glass bangles are usually assumed to have been primarily female ornaments. In Britain, the fashion for coloured glass bangles seems to have arisen around the time of the Roman conquest. This type appears to date from the late 1st to 2nd centuries AD. In the later Roman period, tastes changed and jet bangles were more popular. It used to be thought that Type 2 glass bangles were restricted in their distribution to the North of England and Southern Scotland. However, some of the earliest specimens of Type 2 bangles come from 1st century military sites in southern Britain. However, similar examples have been found close by at Chesters Roman Fort in Nortumberland and at Piercebridge, County Durham. This is an interesting finds as Romano-British glass bangles are not well represented in the archaeological record. During the Roman period, broken glass jewellery and vessels were often melted down and recycled. Thanks To John Geddes


Gallienus Front
Gallienus Back
Gallienus Front
Gallienus Back




Under construction, the below have no photos yet, but if there are any I'll try to get them on here.



Found at: Witton Gilbert Hall.
Quern.
A bun-shaped quern ploughed up in 1983. It is of millstone grit, in excellent condition and of Iron Age type, comprising the top stone, c.38cm diameter, with spindle-hole, hopper and a hole for the handle.
Dates From: Prehistoric - until 70AD.


Found at: Upone building the Sewage Works.
Stone axe.
A polished stone axe found in 1913 by a contractor who, a year later found at the same spot, "a rough stone hammer."
Dates From: Prehistoric - until 70AD.


Remains of Medieval leper hospital.
The hospital of St Mary Magdalene at Witton Gilbert was founded by Gilbert de la Ley c.1154-80 for five, later eight, lepers. The hospital was not in existence at the time of the Dissolution. The present farmhouse incorporates a pointed window of late C12 or early C13, and a round-arched Norman doorway, which was probably the chief entrance to the hospital. The remains of a chapel known at the site and dedicated to St John are possibly located towards the river. A chapel dedicated to St John was also located at Beaurepaire and this may be the same building which has been confused previously. Dates From: Medieval 1066AD to 1540AD.


Stone axe.
A Group VI axe found in 1913 during the preparation of sewage works for the Browney Valley. The axe came from what was thought to be an old bed of the Browney, and was on a gravel surface covered by over 5ft of peat.
Dates From: Prehistoric - until 70AD.


Witton Hall Farm: Cup and Ring Carved Rock.
A carved sandstone boulder measuring 640mm x 490 x 270mm(max dimensions) bearing a number of carvings of a style normally attributed to the late Neolithic or early Bronze-Ages. Three other fragments of similar carved rock have also been found in the near vicinity suggesting that together the stones may have formed part of a curb around a burial cairn or barrow. This stone and the other fragments were in 1995 held in the garden of Witton Hall.
Dates From: Prehistoric - until 70AD.


Fulforth Farm: Cup and Ring carved Rock.
In September 1995 during the ploughing of a field at Fulforth Farm, Witton Gilbert a large sub-rectangular sandstone slab was unearthed. The slab was marked with intricate carvings on top and bottom and was identified as a "cup and ring stone" most likely dating from the late Neolithic/Early Bronze Age. Although partially damaged by plough action the slab and carvings were in extremely"fresh" condition suggesting it had been buried shortly after carving and not subject to weathering. This un-weathered appearance together with its form compared to other similar rocks such as the Gainford Stone strongly suggested that this was the cover or cap stone of a burial cist. Subsequent excavation in 1996 was to confirm this.
Dates From: Prehistoric - until 70AD.


Fulforth Farm: Burial Cist.
Following discovery of the cup and ring stone, the position of the find within the ploughed field was marked. The following year in August 1996 an excavation was undertaken to investigate the site. The carved stone was found to have covered one of two cists cut into the sub-soil surface. It appears likely that these two cists were originally covered by a stone cairn of river cobbles, traces of which remained. The contents and structure of the cists varied but in essence was composed of circular stone cobble sets, possibly inter-cutting one another. Within these stone arrangements, and in the matrix between them were traces of charcoal and bone. Further finds included additional decorated rocks including missing fragments of the cap stone, a polished stone axe and a flint blade.
Dates From: Prehistoric - until 70AD.


Bone tool.
Small bone implement found during excavation for a service trench on the main street of Witton Gilbert at the entrance to "The Fold". The implement/tool is approximately 120mm in length11mm in diameter at one end tapering to a point at the other. Whilst exceptionally smooth, presumably by intent there are no other signs of working/use which might suggest a function.
Dates: Undetermined


Colliery Farm, Archaeological Evaluation. ( Next to the Chapple ).
As part of a planning consent for the development by Bowney Homes, of the area, an archaeological evaluation was commissioned from Archaeological Services, in order to assess the potential impact of the development on the archaeological resource. The evaluation was necessary because of the high archaeological potential of the area, particularly in relation to the Prehistoric carved rocks and funerary deposits which have come to light over recent years. The evaluation took place over a building plot, currently open ground with derelict and upstanding farm buildings, at Colliery Farm and Witton Farm, Witton Gilbert. No significant archaeological features were identified. The remains of a stone farm building, dating between 1857 and 1896, were partially recorded. Previously known prehistoric carvings originating from the development site were recorded.
Dates: Modern - from 1900AD to present


Sleights House: Archaeological Survey.
A phosphate and magentic susceptability survey of a ploughed field to the east of Sleights Farm,Witton Gilbert was undertaken to assess the merits of the two prospection techniques. In addition 2 medieval pottery sherds and a spindle whorl of indeterminate date were also recovered. The survey results identified high anomaly areas with both high phosphate and magnetic susceptability in the area of the pottery finds. This suggests these features may well be of archaeological interest. No further work in the form of test pits or excavation took place at the time of the survey.
Dates: Modern - from 1900AD to present.


28/9 Front Street: 17th century wall.
During renovation work including the insertion of a damp course, plaster was removed from the partition wall between nos. 28 and 29. This revealed the wall to be a timber stud with brick in-fill wall. Bricks dated by Martin Roberts (English Heritage) to c.1650.
Dates: Post Medieval - from 1541AD to 1899AD.


Carved Boulder From Witton Gibert, County Durham: Archaeological Report.. The decorated boulder described here was noticed by Mr R Geddes while ploughing a field close to Witton Gilbert the discovery was reported to Bowes Museum in 1991. The boulder is a coarse sandstone erratic, probably of local origin, and measures 640mm X 490mm with a maximum height of 270mm. In section it forms a rough oval and,as there is no flat face, the decoration, which is pecked, comprises three irregular and conjoined panels which are delineated by inter linked grooves. These panels encompass clusters of cup-marks. The smaller panel contains 2 cups, the second panel contains 7 cups and the third and largest panel has 10 cups. In general the cups are circular with an average diameter of 40mm and they are rarely deeper than 8mm. The decoration on the boulders belongs to a tradition of rock art which,despite a recent claim to the contrary, is considered to be Early Bronze Age. Report by John Pickin (Bowes Museum).
Dates: Modern - from 1900AD to present.








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